• Uncategorised

Upright Canister Stove Reviews, StoveBench Tests, and Gear Guide

By Andrew Marshall, Ryan Jordan, and Chase Jordan

This gear guide features lightweight upright canister stoves for backpacking (i.e., a canister stove that weighs less than 4 oz (113 g) that sits on top of a canister of fuel).

We evaluated the following criteria:

  • Power, efficiency, and fuel economy in control, large water volume, cold temperature, and wind tests
  • Piezo ignitor durability
  • Pot stability
  • Packability
  • Noise
  • Simmering Ability
  • Durability
  • Weight
  • Cost

Among 17 models of stoves that were subjected to rigorous performance testing, the following stoves were the highest rated stoves in our review:

Learn more about our review ratings here.

best canister stove reviews backpacking light stovebench

The MSR PocketRocket Deluxe exhibited the best overall performance across all categories, including the best StoveBench performance in control, wind, cold temperature, large water volume, and stress tests.

MSR POCKET ROCKET DELUXE STOVEBENCH BEST PERFORMANCE CANISTER STOVE

Gear Guide Scope

Herein are the results of a months-long effort to evaluate the detailed performance of the market’s most prominent upright canister stove products. The three of us spent several hundred hours of research, testing, analysis, and writing this 15,000-word report. It is our hope that it would provide a standard of reference that will be useful to backpackers as they consider their options in what has become a very crowded product market.

Upright canister stoves are a subset of a broader product category of canister stoves that also includes integrated canister stoves and remote canister stoves. Stoves from these latter two categories are not included in this gear guide – we’ll save those for another one!

canister stove reviews types

Upright canister stove (left, the MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe), remote canister stove (middle foreground, the Caffin V1), integrated canister stove (right, the MSR Windburner).

Where do Canister Stoves Come From?

The vast majority of OEM (original equipment manufacturer) parts and assemblies for backpacking stoves originate from factories in Russia, China, and Korea. One can generally distinguish products in the upright canister stove market into two categories:

  1. Exclusive stove designs that are designed and marketed under relatively well-known brand names, consisting of unique assemblies of burners, wind blades, stacks, pot supports, valves, and regulators. These brands include MSR, Jetboil, Snow Peak, Soto, Primus, Kovea, Fire Maple, and Optimus. Although you may see some parts of these stoves found in other products, all of the stoves from these brands include either an exclusive combination of parts or custom parts not found in other products. OEM prices for these stoves to the brands are generally $10 to $30, with MSRPs ranging from about $25 to more than $90, with an average in the $40 to $70 range.
  2. Nonexclusive stove designs manufactured by an OEM supplier and sold as OEM units under a variety of different brand names. These represent the vast majority of stoves sold under a variety of odd brand names via the online mega-retailers Amazon and Alibaba. Examples of these brands include BRS, Etekcity, Joyard, Housweety, Redcamp, Etopsell, Monoprice, Hikevalley, TopOne, Icetek, Desert Walker, and Chenbo. OEM prices for these stoves to the brands are generally $1 to $6 per unit, with MSRPs being less than $15.

There is some confusion abounds in the backpacking stove market. For example, while Fire Maple manufactures its own stoves, it also licenses nearly identical designs for distribution under the Olicamp brand. The design of current-model MSR stoves can’t be found anywhere else, but Kovea is one of their OEM suppliers. And Kovea makes their own line of stoves, and they don’t look like MSR stoves. Further adding to the confusion is that OEM suppliers of finished stoves often purchase their parts from other factories, who are also OEM suppliers of finished stoves. Globalization at its chaotic best, perhaps!

Although not a hard-and-fast rule, we found that the exclusive stove designs in category #1 (which are generally more expensive) feature a higher level of manufacturing quality and durability, and offer marginally-to-significantly better performance than the nonexclusive stove designs found in category #2. Of the brands presented in this review, it’s clear to us that MSR and Soto are the market leaders in terms of design and engineering with an eye towards maximizing performance.

Discarding unbranded OEM and white-label knockoffs (defined in category #2 above), we surveyed a total of 35 stoves marketed specifically to the backpacking community from MSR, Jetboil, Snow Peak, Soto, Mons Peak IX, Primus, Kovea, GSI, Optimus, and Fire Maple. We did include two more popular white-labeled brands, BRS and Etekcity. We eliminated any stove that weighed in excess of 8.0 oz (227 g) from this initial survey, as this represents the approximate weight at which significantly more function and performance can be realized by a different stove design (e.g., remote canister, integrated canister or liquid fuel stove).

The average weight of this initial group was 3.3 oz (94 g), with a range of less than 1.0 oz (28 g) to more than 6.0 oz (170 g).

Of the initial group of 35 stoves, we selected 17 stoves (with the heaviest stove being 3.44 oz / 101 g) for a more detailed examination and inclusion in this gear guide. A few are heavier than average, most are lighter than average, and a few are in the truly “ultralight” category (less than 2.0 oz / 57 g).

canister stove reviews all stoves

The following chart details feature and specifications for the stoves featured in this review, and provides our Overall Rating. See the Performance Analysis section below for a detailed performance assessment.

Stove Overall Rating* MSRP (USD) Weight (oz) Regulated Piezo Ignition Burner Diameter (mm) # of Supports Support Radius (mm)
MSR PocketRocket 2 Recommended $45 2.6 no no 25 3 61
MSR PocketRocket Deluxe Highly Recommended $70 2.9 yes yes 37 3 61
Soto Windmaster 4Flex Highly Recommended $65 3.08 yes yes 39 4 72
Soto Micro Regulator Average $70 2.5 yes yes 38 3 55
GSI Pinnacle Above Average $50 2.43 no no 28 3 70
Optimus Crux Lite Average $40 2.61 no no 46 3 55
Fire Maple FMS-300T Above Average $30 1.59 no no 17 3 45
eTekCity Above Average $20 3.34 no yes 20 4 45
Snow Peak GigaPower 2.0 Below Average $50 3.05 no yes 25 4 53
Snow Peak LiteMax Below Average $60 1.99 no no 28 3 62
BRS 3000t Below Average $17 0.89 no no 17 3 41
Kovea Supalite Titanium Below Average $50 2.12 no n/a 29 3 62
Kovea Titanium Below Average $60 3.25 no yes 29 3 62
Jetboil MightyMo Above Average $50 3.44 yes yes 37 3 60
Fire Maple FMS-116t Above Average $40 3.55 no no 45 3 55
Primus Micron Trail Below Average $45 3.25 no yes 32 3 68
Soto Amicus Recommended $45 2.77 no yes 34 4 54

Presented in order from highest to lowest overall grade.

Product photos below are provided by the manufacturer unless otherwise noted.

This newcomer just might be the best upright canister stove available today. The MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe scored the highest in all of our StoveBench tests. And it was the only stove to survive our piezo ignitor tests.

The Pocket Rocket Deluxe had the most stable pot supports, its folding support arms make it reasonably compact, and its dish-shaped burner and pressure regulator make it a top performer in wind and cold.

If all-around best-in-class water boiling performance (in any environmental condition) is what you are after, look no further.

Advantages:

  • Our highest performing stove in all StoveBench tests.
  • Most durable piezo ignitor we’ve tested.
  • Most stable pot support arms we’ve tested.

Disadvantages:

  • High cost.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 93/100
  • Our Rating: Highly Recommended (learn more)
  • MSRP: $70
  • Weight: 2.9 oz (82 g)
  • Buy Now: REI or MSR

Buy Now at REI

The Soto Windmaster 4Flex has been a favorite of performance-minded ultralighters, and for good reason: it’s a solid performer in inclement conditions, especially wind. The Windmaster scored just behind the leader MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe in most of our StoveBench tests and had the second highest overall average StoveBench Score among all stoves in this review.

The Windmaster holds tippy pots well and removable pot support arms make it highly packable.

Trying to decide between the MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe and the Soto Windmaster 4Plex? The MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe is slightly lighter, has a more durable piezo ignitor, offers slightly better performance, but is slightly more expensive and is a bit noisier.

Advantages:

  • Solid StoveBench performance all-around in wind, cold, and large water volume tests – second only to the MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe.
  • Removable pot supports for packability.
  • Grippy pot supports hold tippy pots well.
  • Quiet!

Disadvantages:

  • Failed one of the piezo ignitor tests.
  • Expensive.
  • Heavier than average.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 87/100
  • Our Rating: Highly Recommended (learn more)
  • MSRP: $65
  • Weight: 3.1 oz (88 g)
  • Buy Now: Camp Saver

Buy Now at Camp Saver

The original MSR Pocket Rocket was a workhorse and v2 is even better: more compact, more powerful, and lighter. The MSR Pocket Rocket 2 was a top performer in cold temperature and wind tests.

It’s one of the most compact stoves available, and its pot supports hold tippy pots well at steep angles.

Some will view the lack of piezo ignitor as a drawback, while others will consider this to be an advantage of simplicity and durability.

That’s a lot of performance for a stove of average cost!

Advantages:

  • Very good wind and cold temperature performance.
  • Simple, durable, compact, stable design.

Disadvantages:

  • No piezo ignitor (some users will not view this as a drawback!).

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 84/100
  • Our Rating: Recommended (learn more)
  • MSRP: $45
  • Weight: 2.6 oz (74 g)
  • Buy Now: REI or MSR

Buy Now at REI

At $45, the Amicus competes directly with the MSR PocketRocket 2. Both stoves tied for third place in overall StoveBench performance. The Amicus performed better for large water volumes and in wind, while the Pocket Rocket 2 performed better in the cold and non-inclement conditions.

The Amicus is slightly less stable, and a little more noisy than the Pocket Rocket 2, but these differences are minor.

Advantages:

  • Solid performance in StoveBench tests, especially for wind and large water volumes.
  • Sometimes sold as part of a high-quality and lightweight 2-piece cook set combo.
  • A great value at $45.

Disadvantages:

  • One of the five loudest stoves we tested.
  • Slightly heavier than average.
  • Failed one of the piezo ignitor tests.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 80/100
  • Our Rating: Recommended (learn more)
  • MSRP: $45
  • Weight: 2.8 oz (79 g)
  • Buy Now: REI or Camp Saver

Buy Now at REI

gsi pinnacleAn affordable stove with below-average weight and above-average performance, the GSI Pinnacle is worth a look if you can find one on sale. However, both the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 and the Soto Amicus are slightly cheaper at full price and offer better performance.

Advantages:

  • Just managed to crack the top five overall best-performing stoves in our StoveBench tests.
  • Fractionally lighter than any of the four stoves that performed better.

Disadvantages:

  • Middle-of-the-road performance in large water volume and cold temperature tests.
  • $5 more expensive than two higher-performing stoves (MSR Pocket Rocket 2 and Soto Amicus).

Summary:

Buy Now at Backcountry

6. Fire-Maple Hornet FMS-300T  (Final Score: 75/100)

firemaple 300tThe Fire-Maple FMS-300t is the second lightest stove we tested. Unlike the lightest stove (the BRS 3000t), the metal parts of the 300T don’t melt and deform! The light weight, tiny packed size, and cheap cost are the chief strengths of the 300T.

Overall StoveBench performance was slightly below average, but even though it has a tiny burner, it scored better than expected in our wind and cold tests.

If you’re looking for a micro-sized stove, or have only $30 to spend, this is our recommendation.

Advantages:

  • Tiny size!
  • Durable and simple construction.
  • Good cost-to-performance ratio.
  • 2nd lightest stove in our test group.
  • Good pot stability considering its size.

Disadvantages:

  • Slightly below average performance.
  • Not suitable for large pots or water volumes.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 75/100
  • Our Rating: Above Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $30
  • Weight: 1.6 oz (45 g)
  • Learn More: Fire Maple

Optimus Crux LiteThe Optimus Crux Lite is a good choice for the backpacker-on-a-budget who wants a stove with reasonable performance and can find one on sale.

Otherwise, spend an extra $5 and go with an MSR Pocket Rocket 2 or Soto Amicus – both offer substantially better performance than the now-aged design of the Crux Lite.

Advantages:

  • Good cost-to-performance ratio.
  • One of the quieter stoves we tested.

Disadvantages:

  • Not very compact.
  • Average StoveBench performance in every category.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 71/100
  • Our Rating: Above Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $40
  • Weight: 2.6 oz (74 g)
  • Buy Now: REI

Buy Now at REI

8. BRS 3000t (Final Score: 71/100*)- $17 / 0.89 oz

Is a $17.00 stove that weighs less than an ounce too good to be true?

Our answer is yes.

While the BRS 3000t scored a 71/100 in our final grading, we have to add an asterisk* to that score of 71 for poor and unpredictable durability issues, and thus, give this stove a Below Average rating.

The BRS 3000t is impossibly small and impossibly light and actually performs fairly well (its overall StoveBench score is only slightly below average). But this stove has a long history of malfunction.

The problem is that the pot supports simply don’t hold up under extended heat (due to poorly hardened metal parts). We’d heard anecdotal evidence (we suggest you read our extensive forum conversations about this stove) but didn’t want to believe it until we replicated the malfunction ourselves. The pot supports on our first sample melted. And the pot supports on our second sample melted. In fact, the pot supports on 4 of 7 of our samples melted. Yes, we were so curious about this that we purchased 7 of them. You’re welcome.

The BRS 3000t also happens to be the loudest stove we tested, by a wide margin – we clocked it at 91 dB in a test group that averaged less than 80 dB – that’s right, the BRS 3000t is more than ten times louder than our average stove (because dB is measured on a log scale)! We don’t think the weight and cost savings of this stove are worth the possibility of having to become a cold-soaker without opting in to this sort of lifestyle.

If you’re looking for a micro-sized stove, this is NOT our recommendation – see #6 above, the Fire Maple FMS-300t.

Advantages:

  • Super light.
  • Super cheap.

Disadvantages:

  • Super flimsy.
  • Super loud.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 71/100*
  • Our Rating: *Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $17
  • Weight: 0.9 oz (25 g)
  • Where to Buy: Amazon or Alibaba

9. Etekcity (Final Score: 70/100)

etek city ultralightThe cheap ($20) Etekcity stove manages surprisingly strong StoveBench performance for such a cheap stove. This performance is primarily tied to its low fuel flow rate, which makes it a very fuel-efficient stove, but now a very powerful one. It performed well in our Cold Test and actually matched the Pocket Rocket 2 in our Control Test.

It feels chunky at 3.3 oz (94 g), but it still squeaks out an A for compactibility. Use caution when cooking with narrow pots, this was one of the least stable stoves we tested.

Advantages:

  • Stellar cost-to-performance ratio.
  • Super-affordable.

Disadvantages:

  • On the heavy end of the stoves we tested.
  • Wimpy pot supports make for an unstable cooking surface.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 70/100
  • Our Rating: Above Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $20
  • Weight: 3.3 oz (94 g)
  • Learn More: Etekcity

10. Fire Maple FMS-116T  (Final Score: 69/100)

20130925142215405The Fire Maple FMS-116T has an overall StoveBench score of 0.77 – exactly average. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, especially with a weight of only 1.7 oz (48 g).

The Fire Maple FMS-116T is the least stable stove we tested, tipping our pot on only a 19° incline.

With a B in compactibility (that wide burner head is hard to stow) the 116T is a bit of an enigma – it’s an ultralight stove with average performance and below average cost. This means you get a reasonable amount of bang for your buck – if you can keep your noodles from spilling.

However, spend an extra $5 and you can have one of the top performing stoves in our test, like the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 or Soto Amicus.

Advantages:

  • Ultralight.
  • Streamlined, simple design.
  • Good cost-to-performance ratio.

Disadvantages:

  • Least stable stove in our test group.
  • Average performance.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 69/100
  • Our Rating: Above Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $40
  • Weight: 1.7 oz (48 g)
  • Learn More: Fire Maple

11. Soto Micro Regulator  (Final Score: 68/100)

soto micro regulatorThis little stove leaves us scratching our heads.

The Soto Micro Regulator is tied for the most expensive stove in our review. For the same $70, you could buy our #1 pick – the MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe, which outperforms the Micro Regulator by a large margin in almost every category.

With just average StoveBench scores, combined with below average pot stability, the price makes this stove a little underwhelming.

Advantages:

  • Considered a “lightweight” stove at 2.5 oz (71 g).

Disadvantages:

  • High price for average performance.
  • Struggles in the wind and cold.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 68/100
  • Our Rating: Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $70
  • Weight: 2.5 oz (71 g)
  • Learn More: Soto

jetboil mightymoJetboil has brand pedigree but is known more for its integrated systems than its upright canister stoves. While the MightyMo is the second heaviest stove we tested, it performs well, just missing a top-five placement in the average StoveBench Score.

The MightyMo did well in our Control Test and Cold Test and excelled in our Large Water Volume Test. Like so many other stoves, the Wind Test proved to be the MightyMo’s undoing. Still, it wasn’t far below average in that test, and a $50 price tag might be a good compromise for someone who can’t quite pull the trigger on an MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe or Soto Windmaster 4Flex.

Unfortunately for the MightyMo, it sits at a similar price point to the Soto Amicus and PocketRocket 2, both of which outperform it in nearly every metric. If the Jetboil Mighty Mo came in at $35, we’d be more inclined to recommend a purchase, so keep your eyes peeled for a sale.

Advantages:

  • Above-average performance at (roughly) average cost.
  • Scores particularly well in the Large Water Volume Test.

Disadvantages:

  • The second heaviest stove we tested.
  • A plastic-encased piezo ignitor that failed both of our ignitor durability tests.
  • Competes with the Soto Amicus and MSR Pocket Rocket 2, both of which have better StoveBench scores and cheaper pricing.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 68/100
  • Our Rating: Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $50
  • Weight: 3.4 oz (96 g)
  • Buy Now: REI

Buy Now at REI

7330033909159 SS18 a microntrail stove 22 largePrimus has a long and storied history with mountaineering and backpacking stoves – it’s an iconic brand.

Unfortunately, the Primus Micron Trail is another stove that sits squarely in the middle of the pack with nothing remarkable about it that stands out. Like the Jetboil MightyMo, the Micron Trail has the distinct disadvantage of competing with the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 and Soto Amicus at the same price point.

StoveBench scores for the Primus Micron Trail are poor. In particular, the flat burner head and/or low flame power can’t handle the wind (though it does better than the conical burners on the Kovea and Snow Peak stoves).

For the same amount of money, it’s better spent on the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 or Soto Amicus.

Advantages:

  • Only worth a look if it goes on sale.

Disadvantages:

  • Unremarkable performance at a price point that’s crowded with stoves that perform much better.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 62/100
  • Our Rating: Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $45
  • Weight: 3.3 oz (94 g)
  • Buy Now: Camp Saver

Buy Now at Camp Saver

gigpower ignitor

One of the first sub-100g upright canister stoves ever produced, when the GigaPower was introduced around Y2K it became an instant cult favorite in the ultralight community.

Now in its second iteration, it faces stiff competition. The GigaPower 2.0 has below average performance in all of our tests but particularly suffers in windy conditions due to a low-velocity flame that exits ports on the side of a conical burner. In fact, the GigaPower scored the lowest in our Wind Test of any stove in our testing group. This poor performance drags the GigaPower’s overall score down to well below average.

When you pair that with a B+ in compactibility, a below average level of stability, a 3.1 oz weight (88 g), and a $50 price tag, it appears that time has simply passed the GigaPower by.

Advantages:

  • Large flame pattern allows it to almost score average in the Large Water Volume Test.
  • Retro vibe, but only if you can say you purchased a v1 back in ’99.

Disadvantages:

  • Can’t handle the wind at all. Scored the lowest in our Wind Test of any stove in our testing group.
  • Not worth $50, especially when you consider that two stoves at a similar price point (the GSI Pinnacle and the JetBoil Mighty Mo) both outperform it by a significant margin. For even less money, you can get a top-performing MSR Pocket Rocket 2 or Soto Amicus.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 55/100
  • Our Rating: Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $50
  • Weight: 3.1 oz (88 g)
  • Buy Now: REI

Buy Now at REI

The Snow Peak LiteMax Titanium has the unpleasant distinction of being our lowest performing stove overall in the StoveBench tests. Like the GigaPower 2, the wind is no friend to this stove. The good news is that it’s light: the LiteMax is one of only three stoves we tested that weighs less than two ounces (exact weight on this stove is 1.99 oz).

But for $60? There are lots of better options in this price range, so consider it only if it’s on a steep sale.

Advantages:

  • Ultralight – 2.0 oz (57 g).
  • Very compact and packable.

Disadvantages:

  • Our lowest performing stove overall in the StoveBench tests.
  • Pricey ($60) for what you get.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 53/100
  • Our Rating: Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $60
  • Weight: 2.0 oz (57 g)
  • Buy Now: REI

Buy Now at REI

kovea supalite titaniumIn yet another example of “lighter is not always better”, the 2.12 oz (60.10 g) Kovea Supalite Titanium fails to match the expectations of a $50 stove. It suffers in all categories, but like all of the stoves with conical burners (including the Kovea Titanium, Snow Peak LiteMax and Snowpeak GigaPower 2.0), it has real trouble in the wind.

Advantages:

  • Lighter weight than average.

Disadvantages:

  • The second lowest performing stove in our test group, coming in just ahead of the SnowPeak LiteMax.
  • Poor wind performance.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 51/100
  • Our Rating: Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $50
  • Weight: 2.1 oz (60 g)
  • Buy Now: Camp Saver

Buy Now at Camp Saver

KOV KB 0101 00 846x846The third lowest StoveBench scores in our test group. The Kovea Titanium manages to outdo the Kovea SupaLite Titanium in our Control Test and High Volume Test as well as our Stability Test (it actually ranked as one of the most stable stoves we tested). But it still suffers in the wind and cold. It weighs 3.3 oz (94 g) and costs a mind-boggling $60.

Advantages:

  • In a three-way tie for first place in the Stability Test.

Disadvantages:

  • How does this stove cost $60? Spend $5 to $10 more to purchase the Soto Windmaster or MSR Pocket Rocket Deluxe, or spend $10 less for a Soto Amicus or MSR Pocket Rocket 2, and get a stove with better performance in (almost) every measurable way.

Summary:

  • Final Grade: 48/100
  • Our Rating: Below Average (learn more)
  • MSRP: $60
  • Weight: 3.3 oz (94 g)
  • Buy Now: Camp Saver

Buy Now at Camp Saver

Member’s Only Content

Login as a Premium or Unlimited Member to read more comprehensive Market Analysis, Product Category Analysis, and Performance Assessment sections of this review:

  • Canister Stoves: An Overview
    • What do we mean when we say “canister stove”?
    • What type (brand) of fuel canister should I use?
    • How do I use a canister stove in the cold?
    • How do I improve fuel economy with a canister stove?
    • Gross Wattage vs. Efficiency
    • What do I do with partially-used fuel canisters?
    • Can I recycle my fuel canisters?
    • Can I travel with fuel canisters?
    • What about other types of stoves?
      • Liquid (gas) fuel stoves
      • Alcohol stoves
      • Solid fuel stoves
      • Wood stoves
      • Wood fires
      • Integrated canister stoves
      • Remote canister stoves
      • Upright canister stoves
    • Canister stove safety
    • Common failure points and how to avoid them
  • Design Considerations for Upright Canister Stoves
    • Parts and Pieces
    • Burner Design
    • Burner Diameter vs. Power (Analysis)
    • Burner Diameter vs. Efficiency (Analysis)
    • Windscreens
    • Ignition
    • Cold Weather and High Altitude Performance
    • Packability
    • Simmering
    • Stability and Safety
  • Performance Criteria
    • Stove power, efficiency, and fuel economy
    • Efficiency vs. power
    • Test protocol descriptions
      • The StoveBench Control Test
      • The StoveBench Large Water Volume Test
      • The StoveBench Wind Test
      • The StoveBench Cold Temperature Test
      • The StoveBench Stress Test
      • Piezo Ignitor Durability Test
      • Pot Stability Test
      • Compactibility Test
      • Noise Test
      • Weight
      • Cost
        • Are cost and performance correlated (analysis)
  • Performance Analysis
    • StoveBench Results
      • The StoveBench Control Test
      • The StoveBench Large Water Volume Test
      • The StoveBench Wind Test
      • The StoveBench Cold Temperature Test
      • The StoveBench Stress Test
      • StoveBench Summary
    • Piezo Ignitor Durability
    • Pot Stability
    • Compactibility
    • Noise
    • Simmering
  • Performance Summary and Final Grades
  • Recommendations
    • Best Performance for the Weight
    • Best Value
    • Best Durability
    • Best Fuel Economy
    • Best Power
    • Best All-Around (Runner Up)
    • Best All-Around

Member’s only version is 15,000+ words and includes more than 65 photographs, tables, and graphs.

Updated September 15, 2018

  • How we acquired these products: Product(s) discussed in this review were either acquired by the author from a retailer or otherwise provided by the manufacturer at a discount/donation with no obligation to provide media coverage or a product review to the manufacturer(s).
  • We do not accept money or in-kind compensation for guaranteed media coverage: Backpacking Light does not accept compensation or donated product in exchange for guaranteed media placement or product review coverage.
  • Affiliate links: Some (but not all) of the links in this review may be “affiliate” links, which means if you click on a link to one of our affiliate partners (usually a retailer site), and subsequently make a purchase with that retailer, we receive a small commission. This helps us fund our editorial projects, podcasts, instructional webinars, and more, and we appreciate it a lot! Thank you for supporting Backpacking Light!

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *